Have a Question? Contact the Humanities Office or an Academic Unit

ECF articles, free to read: click on the article title

©McMaster University, 2015. All articles published on the Eighteenth-Century Fiction website are protected by copyright held by Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a journal published by the Faculty of Humanities at McMaster University.

Vol. 12 articles: for subscriptions, print or electronic, or to purchase individual articles or individual issues, please visit the University of Toronto Press website.

Via an institutional subscription (many colleges and universities), you can read any of these ECF articles on Project MUSE.

Volume 12, Number 4 (July 2000)
Lincolnshire Babylon: Competing Typologies in Pamela’s 137th Psalm
by MICHAEL AUSTIN
Privacy, Dissimulation, and Propriety: Frances Burney and Jane Austen
by PATRICIA MEYER SPACKS
A Sort of Notch in the Donwell Estate: Intersections of Status and Class in Emma
by PAUL DELANY
Célestin/Célestine: Ambiguities of Identity chez Mme de Genlis
by BONNIE ARDEN ROBB

Volume 12, Number 2-3 (January-April 2000)
Reconsidering the Rise of the Novel
Flat-Footed and Fly-Blown: The Realities of Realism
by IAN WATT
A Matter Discutable: The Rise of the Novel
by W.B. CARNOCHAN
Two or Three Things I Know about Setting
by MAX BYRD
The Man Who Came to Dinner: Ian Watt and the Theory of Formal Realism
by MICHAEL SEIDEL
A Question of Beginnings
by ROBERT B. ALTER
Serious Reflections on the Farther Adventures of Daniel Defoe (with an Excursus on the Farther Adventures of Ian Watt and Two Notes on the Present State of Literary Studies)
by J. PAUL HUNTER
Gendered Cultural Criticism and the Rise of the Novel: The Case of Defoe
by MAXIMILLIAN E. NOVAK
Watt’s Rise of the Novel within the Tradition of the Rise of the Novel
by MICHAEL MCKEON
Did You Say Middle Class?: The Question of Taste and the Rise of the Novel
by ROBERT MAYER
Mary Davys’ Probable Feign’s Stories and Critical Shibboleths about “The Rise of the Novel”
by J.A. DOWNIE
Ideas and Voices: The New Novel in Eighteenth-Century England
by JOHN RICHETTI
Personal Effects and Sentimental Fictions
by DEIDRE LYNCH
Personal Identity, Narrative, and History: The Female Quixote and Redgauntlet
by EVERETT ZIMMERMAN
Staging Readers Reading
by WILLIAM BEATTY WARNER
Fatal Fluency: Behn’s Fiction and the Restoration Letter
by JANET TODD
Shandyism, Or, The Novel in Its Assy Shape: African Apuleius, The Golden Ass, and Prose Fiction
by MARGARET ANNE DOODY
The New Model Eighteenth-Century Novel
by ROBERT FOLKENFLIK
Reconsidering Origins: How Novel Are Theories of the Novel?
by LENNARD DAVIS

Volume 12, Number 1 (October 1999)
Reading Prose Fiction: Lyric Convention in Aphra Behn and Eliza Haywood
by G. GABRIELLE STARR
Clarissa Harlowe, Mary Astell, and Elizabeth Carter: John Norris of Bemerton’s Female “Descendants”
by DEREK TAYLOR
Ciceronian Eloquence: The Politics of Virtue in Richardson’s Pamela
by JOHN A. DUSSINGER
De Neuchâtel à la Martinique: espace et mouvement chez Mme de Charrière
by GUILLEMETTE SAMSON
Where the World May Ne’er Invade? Green Retreats and Garden Theatre in La Princesse de Clèves, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, and Cecilia
by J. DAVID MACEY, Jr.

©McMaster University, 2015. This copyright covers the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article, including in electronic forms, reprints, translations, photographic reproductions, or similar. While reading for personal use is encouraged, Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles may not be reproduced, broadcast, published, or re-disseminated without the prior written permission of Eighteenth-Century Fiction at McMaster University. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a web site or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material is not allowed. The copyright in this website includes without limitation the text, computer code, artwork, photographs, images, music, audio, video, and audio-visual material on this website and is owned by McMaster University. ©McMaster University 2015.

Read ECF journal vols. 1-28 on Project MUSE.